The Jobs We Signed Up For

Posted in Life, on

Steve Jobs, 1955-2011

Today on Facebook, I saw a status update from a person who was complaining about his current workterm placement after attending a college technology program for three years. He asked, “So when do I get the job I signed up for?”

While statements like these rub me the wrong way on a good day, I was completely dumbfounded at how anyone could say it today, of all days. A day after the passing of Steve Jobs, one of the most hardworking, passionate, and inspirational technology visionaries of our time.

Thank you Steve, for inspiring so many of us to work harder toward our goals and to never settle for less. While his attitude resonates with a lot of us, there are still many people out there who have no spark, no drive, no ambition — yet have a serious sense of self-entitlement just for dishing out tuition to attend school. When will they realise it’s not that simple?

We don’t sign up for jobs. We work for them. Sure, some people get lucky, but those who don’t need to make it for themselves.

To that person, I leave them with this tweet, spotted on my feed earlier today.

Jonathan Moss Tweet

 

Photo of Geri Coady

About Me

I’m Geri Coady — a designer and illustrator from St. John’s, Newfoundland — now living in Nottingham, UK. I've got an eye for detail, a passion for the web, and I'm ready to work with clients worldwide. Want to learn more?

14 Comments

Liam Kelly
  • Liam Kelly

Great blog post Geri!

You're so right. Way too many people go through life without ever pushing themselves to the limit and just expect things to fall in their lap. The best things in life aren't free, and it's those who fight for what they truly love and believe in, no matter what the price, that will receive the greatest of rewards. I'm very excited, for example, of what you will achieve in the near future with that creative mind and positive outlook on life. Keep up the great work Geri!

Geri Coady
  • Geri Coady

Thanks Liam! Definitely something I had to get off my chest.

I remember being asked in college how I was so "good" and what my tricks were. The people asking me were the very people who never touched a computer after class to practice (beyond finishing required coursework). Summer vacation would come and go without them even starting a personal project. If you don't love what you do, it might be time to look for something else.

Nevin Lyne
  • Nevin Lyne

Very well said, and thank you for saying it. It has always amazed me too just how many people want "better" in life, but really don't understand its not handed to you. The simple fact that there is hard work that goes into it escapes most. There are no tricks, there is only ambition and in most cases deep sacrifices to get there, and it never really hurts to "Think Different".

Will
  • Will

Really? ...Really?

First of all, it was "when do I get TO DO the job I signed up for", which is more or less completely different from the line you made up to inspire this blog post. But perhaps my conveyance was not completely clear; I will admit to having edited that message a few times while trying to fit my frustration into one facebook status message. There is, of course, going to be a certain quantity of bitch work in any support job; I have plunged toilets and gone on literal fetch quests while under the employ of some very wonderful technology companies previous to this, for whom I was also able to do a lot of actual, meaningful work. What was apparently missing from my post is that there has been nothing -but- bitch work, for the six weeks I've been here, when "the job I signed up for" was, primarily, installing Windows 7. My issue is not that I deserve a job for enduring three years of college, it is that I would appreciate it if the job I went and got was at least somewhat of an approximation of what was written on the job posting, and if the experience I was gaining would be even tangentially relevant to my future career prospects. Any imbecile in off the street can do what I'm doing right now, and wouldn't need to pay three years of tuition to do a good job of it either. I'm going to go out on a limb and propose that you have read -far- too deeply into a facebook vent.

And you do know I'm in Halifax, right...? Relocating to a different province for four months, leaving my fiancee alone while I'm gone, and having to arrange everything on short notice by myself in order to finish my program and beef up my resume is pretty slack of me, I guess. On the upside, now I can add "writes on a clipboard like a champ" and "knows how to pick winners off kijiji" under Relevant Skills!...
~A person

Geri
  • Geri

Yes, I'll admit I wrote my blog in about five minutes and probably should have focussed on attitude in general and not specific Facebook status updates. My gripe in general is not one with a single comment or complaint, but the comment did inspire me to think about people who absolutely do not work above and beyond the coursework given to them and then expect to magically have enough talent or skill to get a job. 

I also should have said "to people with an attitude of x" instead of singling you out specifically, but again, I was trying to make this timely, but probably should have sat on it until the morning after another dose of editing.

However much you practice to hone your skills and build your portfolio outside of school or work is not something I can comment on as I have never seen your programming portfolio (do you have one online?), but I do know plenty of others who have trouble gaining employment yet do not lift a finger in their spare time to focus on improvement. It's great that you're in Halifax and taking steps toward your goals, but always remember that we can all do more. Us, having all our tools at our disposal, especially in technology, have no excuse any more for learning or doing whatever we want. And if we don't take advantage of that, it's because of our own decisions, nobody else's.

So, I apologise for rushing through this and perhaps misinterpreting what you said in that status as something else, but my views still stand toward hard work, finding jobs, and the spark of passion that seems to be non-existent in so many people today.

Geri
  • Geri

Also, I really need to fix line breaks on this thing! ;)

Will
  • Will

You can't give commenters line breaks, or before you know it they'll be trying to own land and vote!

I probably would have a programming portfolio around somewhere, if I wanted to be a programmer... my first support workterm (of three) convinced me that I would probably enjoy that aspect of IT more. Programming is fun, but I think eight hours of it every day would begin to wear thin eventually.

I can agree with the general gist of the post, of course. Wish I could say I've never posted too quick, heh heh.
~Will

Neo
  • Neo

When we hear the word Apple and iPhone, what comes to our mind is none other than Steve Jobs. His contributions to the tech world are beyond explainable.
fashion for play
I never get the chance to use all these Apple products in the best possible manner.

Tony
  • Tony

I wonder how some people like you've mentioned in this post could easily complain about everybody. They should check themselves before attempting to these sort of complains and they just got to think once before they can make statements. My heartful respect to Mr. Steve Jobs. He's such a great persons among those who had influenced this world. Thanks.
Regards,
apple.com

StevenStifler34
  • StevenStifler34

Steve Jobs was one of the most hardworking, and passionate. Everyone knows that he inspired many people to work harder towards their goals and to never settle for less. In fact, that may be his motto. And talking about College technology placement programs, even though many people got placed in campus selections, not everyone can stay with the company till the end. That may be due to the lack of intelligence required for the position or something else. But many students from colleges depend upon college students reviews on reviews4students com , who can be considered the wisest among them, who plans to choose the right path to get succeeded in their career. Finally, I would like to say the fact that the talented with hardworking nature will find success for sure as Steve did. Thanks for the share.

AOLIN
  • AOLIN

It is our era's most hard-working, passionate, and inspiring one technology dreamer. However, we can still make a difference.

limi
  • limi

The most hard-working, passionate, and inspiring people in one of the technical visionaries. I love apples. 2015watches

enlaniebla
  • enlaniebla

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